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October was Outrageous

Every month I am reminded of how lucky I am to be a part of Science for Georgia.

We had SciTober Fest!!! A huge thank you to Monday Night Brewing for hosting us and providing beer. And to Garnish and Gather for providing a locally sourced meal kit. And to IEEE WIE and IEEE YP and AWIS for being the best sponsoring partners ever. Beer was had. Molly Samuel inspired us to talk to the media. And bingo was played.

Importantly, Louis challenged each of us to commit to making science matter in our community.

Great news! We’ve got some ways for you to do that.

One – as a follow on to our amazing Food Insecurity roundtable – Brooke Lappe, Jordan Ellison and myself provided information to the Georgia Senate Study Committee on Improving Access to Health Foods and Eliminating Food Deserts. Following on the advice of our roundtable participants, we spoke about the true cost of food, and recommended a state agency transparently measure food metrics, the formation of community public-private coordination committees, and expansion of great programs like Farm-to-School.

Want to help out with food insecurity? Don’t forget your local food bank and reduce your food waste by buying what you need, eating all of it, and composting your waste. This places less strain on the food system and the environment, thus lowering the cost of food.

Two – the Okefenokee Swamp is under threat from a proposed mine. Write the EPD and/or your local legislator to let them know to fix it.

Three – we are continuing forward on our education and workforce pipeline advocacy. Want to help? Spread the good word that reading 15 minutes a day can change a life. Or volunteer to read to kids.

These priorities will be carried through the legislative session which starts in Jan. Look for some great ways to get involved in the coming months…

Four – too much effort? Just give us some cold hard cash and we’ll do the heavy lifting for you!

Updated on October 29, 2021

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